Workshops on continuous quality improvement in aged care

workshopsOur Continuous Quality Improvement workshops are designed for the aged care sector. These typically consist of 4 full-day workshops, at intervals of 4-6 weeks. The aim is to train and equip teams of champions, at different levels within the organisation, who can lead quality improvement processes. Ideally these teams will consist of healthcare assistants, registered nurses, clinical managers and other care staff such as occupational therapist, kitchen staff etc.

During the workshops the participants work on a small, practical project that demonstrates the steps of continuous quality improvement. Care-Metric Ltd uses the the methodology of the Clinical Micro System, as designed by Paul Batalden.

The following topics are discussed during the workshops:

• Working with principles of Continuous Quality Improvement
• Defining the Clinical Micros system of my organisation/department
• Designing measures that matter (process, outcome and balance)
• Understanding run charts
• Dealing with implementation barriers
• Setting up a sustainable Plan-Do-Study-Act cycle plan.

“ In our sector we collect considerable data but at times we fail to interpret and use this to truly make quality improvements. This training by Care-Metric brings meaning to the data and change for the better.”

Judith Johnson, consultant to the aged care sector

“Jan Weststrate (Care-Metric) facilitated a number of quality improvement workshops with teams of staff from Presbyterian Support Central Enliven Homes. Each team consisted of a clinical manager, registered nurse and health care assistant. Jan geared the workshops to meet organisational needs, used existing data and at the same time made them fun and practical, and allowed the teams to practice what they had learned. The 4–5 month timeframe coupled with the friendly competition between teams ensured homework was completed and projects followed the timelines. Jan’s ongoing feedback on the process ensured the projects stayed on track. Each team learned not only from their own experience but from those of others. This approach should ensure that the skills are embedded and the culture of quality improvement enhanced and practiced.”

Nicola Turner, General Manager Residential Presbyterian Support Central

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